Good As Gold

If you’ve ever stroked your wedding band across a sore eye, you might be aware that gold has a plethora of benefits besides looking pretty.

The rare metallic element guarantees the value of currencies, sets jewellery, and conducts electricity. Now, it’s glamming up the aesthetics scene and infusing several skincare lines.

From a marketing perspective, its presence in high-end potions is not surprising. After all, it’s the ultimate symbol of luxury. But gold is peppering serums, treatments and moisturisers for specific skin-health benefits.

Despite its trending status, this is not a new phenomenon. In fact, gold has been a central element in beauty rituals for thousands of years.

Cleopatra apparently slept in a 24 carat mask to enhance her beauty. The Romans used gold preparations to treat skin lesions. And, in Chinese medicine, it was the secret to a youthful appearance.

These days, it’s broken down into tiny “nano” particles that can be easily absorbed into the skin.

We explore the power of this precious metal in skincare and share its true benefits. No buzz!

Recapture Cleopatra’s Secret

“The power of precious minerals has a tremendous influence on the skin cells,” says Bernadette Soares, Founder and Managing Director of Phâro 24 Carat Rose Gold Facial and skincare collection.

“When combined with our Phâro facial massage and mask (pictured at top of page) it provides the client with a rejuvenating treatment working on the facial muscles and deep layers of the skin.

“Gold stimulates cellular growth of the deepest layer of the skin to regenerate healthy, firm skin cells and provide a tightening effect. Its anti-inflammatory properties are also thought to decrease inflammation and it seems to slow down melanin secretion and thus reduce age spots.”

The signature ingredients featured in the facial and skincare collection include gold, rose water, rose distillate and rose oil.

Anti-inflammatory=Anti-ageing

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Sometimes injected by doctors to treat rheumatoid arthritis, gold is renowned for being anti-inflammatory.

While there’s no solid scientific data confirming gold as an “anti-ageing” ingredient, there’s a connection between inflammation and ageing.

Edible Beauty‘s Gold Rush Eye Balm works on this very principle. It contains tiny, gold leaf particles that melt into the skin upon contact. It aims to reduce fine-lines, wrinkles and other signs of ageing.

“The ability to reduce inflammation is closely associated with the ability to reduce the breakdown of collagen and elastin skin cells. This means gold helps to firm and plump the skin,” explains Anna Mitsios, creator of Edible Beauty.

Illuminating

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“Gold particles are like minute bits of sun. They reflect light and lend skin a lustrous glow,” says Susie Sierra, who has recently released two skin serums laced with the element.

While studies are yet to confirm gold as an effective anti-ageing ingredient, there’s no counter-argument to the glow-factor.

Sierra Gold serums contain 24 carat gold leaf particles. These lend the skin instant luminosity and dissolve like magic.

Cell-Stimulating

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According to ayurvedic medicine, gold has warming qualities and can rejuvenate skin. The precious metal contains ions which stimulate cells, nerves and veins leading to improved blood circulation.

Good circulation keeps skin looking healthy by eliminating toxins and boosting the metabolism of skin cells.

Omveda products are formulated on Ayurvedic principles. The Gold collection is designed to regenerate dead skin cells in mature skin and is infused with gold nano particles.

Emotional Healinghappygold

Devotees will testify to the harmonising effect gold has on the mind, body and spirit.

This connection between state of mind and state of skin could be a prime reason skincare infused with the precious ingredient is so popular right now.

Associated with feelings of love, rarity and luxury, gold skincare is a (relatively) affordable treat for the senses.

“I think gold elicits a very powerful emotional response. When I apply my face oils to a clients’ skin, I watch as their whole face lights up,” says Susie Sierra.

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